Age-specific magnitude and causes of visual impairment in a tertiary health care centre in rural Karnataka

  • Dr. Chaitra M C Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Tamaka, Kolar, Karnataka, India https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8959-0139
  • Dr. Reshma Ravindra Senior Resident, Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Tamaka, Kolar, Karnataka, India
  • Dr. Rashmi G. Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Tamaka, Kolar, Karnataka, India https://orcid.org/
  • Dr. Varsha V. Post-Graduate, Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Tamaka, Kolar, Karnataka, India
Keywords: Visual impairment, Diabetic retinopathy, Glaucoma

Abstract

Introduction: Approximately 80% of all vision impairment globally is considered avoidable. More than one-fifth of visual impairment is contributed by people in the age group of 0–49 years. Hence this study was conducted to determine the magnitude and causes of visual impairment among the population aged between 15-50 years and to determine the association of visual impairment with sociodemographic variables.

Methodology: This study was a Hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted between February 2019 to January 2020 at R L Jalappa Hospital and Research Centre, a tertiary care hospital at a rural area, Tamaka, Kolar. The sample size was 400 and consisted of all patients aged between 15-50 years, who visited Ophthalmology outpatient department. After noting subjects sociodemographic details according to the updated BG Prasad socioeconomic classification, all subjects underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examination.

Results: Refractive error was found to be present mostly in the age group of 31-45 and it was most commonly seen in the graduates. Uncorrected refractive error (55%) was found to be the most common cause of visual impairment, followed by cataract (30%). Other anterior segment pathology and posterior segment pathology accounts for 6.5% and 7.5% respectively of the visual impairment.

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Published
2020-08-31
How to Cite
Dr. Chaitra M C, Dr. Reshma Ravindra, Dr. Rashmi G., & Dr. Varsha V. (2020). Age-specific magnitude and causes of visual impairment in a tertiary health care centre in rural Karnataka. Tropical Journal of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, 5(6), 125-130. https://doi.org/10.17511/jooo.2020.i06.02
Section
Original Article